Lenses - Part 1

LENSES

 

At Dawkins & Lodge, we are able to offer a wide range of lenses, from a variety of suppliers.  In the first part of our Lenses blog, we will explain the various categories that we supply, and explain how each can be suitable for different patients.

 Lens Styles

 Progressive Lenses

Progressive lenses, often known as varifocals, are the top end lens on the market today, and enable the user to focus clearly on items at different distances.  They progress in power through to reading at the bottom.  It is a gradual change allowing focus at all working distances.

Thus, with a slight tilt of the head, the wearer is able to focus clearly on whichever distance they need at any particular time.

As a general rule, the better the quality of the lens, the wider the reading section at the bottom is.

The latest technology has removed the old problem where the lens appeared distorted towards the edges.  The very best progressive lenses now give clear vision across the lens.

This lens style is most suited to those who are presbyopic, and either need to wear glasses all the time, or prefer to wear to enable them to perform tasks without swapping glasses or looking for them.


Bifocal Lenses


Bifocal lenses usually offer the wearer good focus points for distance and reading, but do not usually provide for an intermediate distance (eg arms length, or the normal distance of a computer screen).

The change from one prescription to the other is not gradual, and there is a discernible line where the powers change.

There are many different types of bifocal lenses, with options ranging from a straight line, either full or part way across the lens, or a semi-circle, again of varying widths.  The most popular style of bifocal is the D28, which has the appearance on a D turned 90 degrees, providing the flat part of the shape at the top of the reading section.


Occupational Lenses


These lenses also provide two different powers, without a dividing line.  However, these distances are usually for reading and VDU use (arms length).  Some types of occupational lens provide for limited distance vision.

Ideally suited to those who read and use VDU screens during their working day, for instance, receptionists and call centre operatives.

Single Vision Lenses

 

Single Vision lenses provide a single power and are made up to one of distance, VDU or reading prescriptions.  They can also be made suitable for specific hobbies such as model making and engraving, where the user needs sharp vision at a distance closer than normal reading.


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